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FLOAT TUBE FISHING FORUM » Float Tubes, Pontoons and Related Equipment Discussions » Float Tube, Pontoon, and Equipment Related Discussions » Rust and pontoon preservation

Rust and pontoon preservation

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26 Re: Rust and pontoon preservation on Tue Sep 09, 2014 4:10 pm

Renegade


Bobber
Bobber
bodfish wrote: frameless u boat designs except that they do not provide structural integrity to the craft, something I think is crucial to increasing speed, maneuverability, modularity and safety, to the pontoon.

     bodfish


What frameless are you talking about? I am pretty sure any of the North Fork Outdoors frameless and even the Outcast frameless offer everything a framed boat can offer. They are crazy light so maneuverability and speed are off the charts. Structural integrity, with the aluminum motor mount you can run up to a 9 hp gas motor on any of the NFO frameless. There are at least three air chambers. The seat area is not touching the water and the rocker end give it a very small foot print. They are very safe and easier to climb back in should you fall out.
Need to check one out some time, you would like it I think.

But I am interested in what you come up with frame wise. My aluminum frames are light and nice but I would love to try a synthetic...LOL

27 Re: Rust and pontoon preservation on Tue Sep 09, 2014 6:17 pm

Vagabond

avatar
Old Timer
Old Timer
I wonder if delrin or fiberglass reinforced nylon could also be a frame material possibility. Delrin is some serious tough and corrosion resistant material with great machining properties.

28 Re: Rust and pontoon preservation on Wed Sep 10, 2014 9:05 pm

bodfish


Junior
Junior
Hey guys,
sorry for the late response, I do like the NFO designs, they are brilliant, simple and effective... but I am an old school guy who really likes a solid frame for modular accessorizing, structural integrity, cargo capacity... etc., etc., As well I am attempting to take the float craft to the next level, and I am convinced that a light, strong, synthetic frame is the place to start. anyways there you have it... PS. truth be told it is the inflatable pontoon itself that I take issue with. I think there are better ideas that have yet to be explored by the industry. I think they could be so much more than they are.. I have the designs but sadly not the funds to do the proto work. Ah well, one step at a time....

Oh, vagabond, Delrin? Hmmmm,... gonna check it out thnx.

29 Re: Rust and pontoon preservation on Thu Sep 11, 2014 6:07 am

Renegade


Bobber
Bobber
bodfish wrote:Hey guys,
accessorizing, structural integrity, cargo capacity... etc., etc.,  


Either of these? No frame but they have everything a frame has. Best part, the Green on (two man) weighs under 36lb and the blue one under 24lbs.
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Can take it one step further. No frame but tons of integrity and cargo capacity, plus you can stand
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Good luck with the next evolution, I can't wait to see it. Love technology!

30 Re: Rust and pontoon preservation on Thu Sep 11, 2014 11:46 pm

chipmcd


Bobber
Bobber
THanks guys for the help and all the info.

I'm still in the process of getting all the rubber plugs for the frame (2 different sizes) and I think I'm gonna use a silicone caulk to seal it up. This will be after using a nylon 12ga cleaning brush and an air compressor to get the insides as clean as possible. Hopefully it will leave a minimum of maintenance with only the interlocking sections to be cared for. Maybe a dip in a rubbing coating, Boeshield, or wax could be used.

With all the materials mentioned and the common theme of a problem, it has got my creative juices going. Think I'm going to be hitting up a couple of my engineering and design buddies for a solution.

31 Re: Rust and pontoon preservation on Fri Sep 12, 2014 7:13 am

Renegade


Bobber
Bobber
Is you frame one solid piece or does it break down? If it breaks down, are you not worried about water in the connections, or do you plan on making it one piece? I would be afraid of water getting in and no where to get out.
Doesn't washing the pontoon off with fresh water after a day of use then air and towel dry help?
With invasive species possible, I scrub my boat down after every use.

32 Re: Rust and pontoon preservation on Fri Sep 12, 2014 10:27 am

chipmcd


Bobber
Bobber
Renegade wrote:Is you frame one solid piece or does it break down? If it breaks down, are you not worried about water in the connections, or do you plan on making it one piece? I would be afraid of water getting in and no where to get out.
Doesn't washing the pontoon off with fresh water after a day of use then air and towel dry help?
With invasive species possible, I scrub my boat down after every use.

The frame is sectioned into six pieces and eight connections between them (two side members, two foot bars, a seat member and a rear deck.) As for water in the connections, I guess there will always be water in the connection points as the holes for the lock pins make sure of that. The foot bars are the worst because there are multiple holes to make them adjustable. I am contemplating on leaving them off because I don't use them that much and I have found it easier to control the pontoon with my fins while rowing (also can kick while rowing to speed it up as well.) I'm planning on inserting the rubber stoppers into the frame and sealing them with a silicone caulk just past the point of where the tubing that slips inside the connections end. That way, hopefully, there will only be a need for minimal maintenance for the internals of the frame and connections.

Apparently, washing doesn't help that much when saltwater is concerned. I wash my pontoon immediately after every outing with soapy water, hang parts to dry, while finishing the rest of the pontoon. I try not to have water go inside the tubing and I even place rubber caps over the ends of the connection points to help prevent it (the rubber caps are originally intended to help protect those ends from dents and scratches and tearing holes in the canvas storage duffel I use.) After everything is washed and hung to dry, I hit the insides of the frame with my air compressor. I still had an old school push rod shotgun cleaning kit; I used a new nylon 12ga brush on the “powdery rust” residue inside the frame tubing and microfiber towel strips to wipe it out.

It is odd because the frame is powder coated black on the outside and the inside of the tubing is also coated/painted with something. It is not raw metal but the surface is black colored, shiny and smooth to the touch but not as thick as the outside.

I'm looking at frameless now, as I origianlly did before but, I may keep this as a test bed for projects.

33 Re: Rust and pontoon preservation on Fri Sep 12, 2014 12:12 pm

Renegade


Bobber
Bobber
Thanks for all the great info. Sounds like you are doing all one can.
If I ever become salt water bound, I know I will be frameless! But I like them anyway..LOL

34 Re: Rust and pontoon preservation on Thu Oct 02, 2014 12:14 pm

chipmcd


Bobber
Bobber
Finally got all my rubber stoppers from Home Depot. While picking up the silicone caulking in the paint section, I ran across DAPtex Plus, a foam sealant for windows and doors. I'm curious. I'm thinking of using in place of, or in conjunction with, the stopper and silicone. I might test it out on some scrap tubing and see how it works submerged for a time.

Has anyone use this stuff before? Any thoughts?


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